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Postdoctoral Researcher - Molecular Cell Biology and Mammalian Cells (R3362)  « Position Deleted on 7/19/2012 »

Institution: St. John's University
Location: Queens, NY
Category:
  • Admin - Laboratory and Research
  • Faculty - Science - Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • Faculty - Science - Biology
Posted: 03/16/2012
Application Due: Open Until Filled
Type: Full Time
This position is no longer an active posting on HigherEdJobs
St. John's University is Catholic, Vincentian and Metropolitan. We are committed to attracting, motivating, and retaining a highly qualified and diverse workforce to support our mission of academic excellence and the pursuit of wisdom. Known for over 100 years of proud athletic tradition, our Big East excitement keeps Red Storm fans cheering.

Ranked among America's top universities by The Princeton Review, St. John's University educates leaders for today's global society through quality academics, high-tech resources and an expanding international presence. With 1,500 Faculty and 1,700 Administrators/Staff, St. John's is a leading Catholic University in the Vincentian tradition, dedicated to making a positive difference in people's lives through active engagement in issues of energy and resource conservation, social justice and global citizenship. These values enhance the academic experience of more than 20,000 undergraduate and graduate students on three residential New York City campuses in Queens, Staten Island and Manhattan; a graduate center in Oakdale, NY; an international campus in Rome, Italy; and learning centers in other locations worldwide.

Title: Postdoctoral Researcher - Molecular Cell Biology and Mammalian Cells
Department: Biological Sciences
Campus: Queens

Job Summary:
Structure function relationship of DJ-1/PARK7 and SOD1.

We have shown that DJ-1/PARK7 interacts with and activates SOD1 in a copper-dependent fashion ultimately leading to removal of oxygen radicals. In collaboration with Dr. Mark Odell, UK, we have further shown the mechanism of copper binding to DJ-1/PARK7. The successful candidate will expand on these findings by mapping interaction domains, activity states of SOD1 and together with Dr. Odell aid in the structure determination of human DJ-/PARK7 in a complex with SOD1. The successful candidate will also identify and test the interaction potential of other DJ-1 interacting proteins to assess whether there are several DJ-1 complexes in different cell types under different cellular conditions, particularly under conditions of stress. Similar experiments will also be performed in plants to identify novel DJ-1 protein complexes and show how they relate to human DJ-1 complexes.

Responsibilities:

  • Perform research related to Parkinson's Disease.
  • Participate in general laboratory tasks.

Qualifications:

  • Ph.D level with Molecular Cell Biology.
  • Molecular Cell Biology and mammalian cells expertise.
  • This position is subject to a comprehensive background screen, with employment contingent upon satisfactory results. If access to a University vehicle is required for the position, a DMV check for driving record and valid driver's license is also required.

St. John's offers a competitive compensation program which is commensurate with your qualifications, experience, and contingent upon the departmental budget. We also offer an extremely comprehensive benefits program to meet the diverse needs of our workforce. Along with exceptional benefits such as medical, dental, life insurance, long term disability insurance, tuition remission, generous 403(b) employer contribution, employee assistance program, and liberal paid time off policies, faculty and staff can also enjoy St. John's performing arts, libraries, bookstores, dining facilities, campus recreation and sporting events.

St. John's University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applications from women and minorities.

St. John’s University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applications from women and minorities.